On Superstorm Sandy Anniversary, New York is Ranked Most Vulnerable U.S. City [Newsweek]

By Nina Burleigh for Newsweek on October 29, 2017 Superstorm Sandy slammed the coasts of New Jersey and New York five years ago Sunday, leading to 157 deaths, 51 square miles of flooding in New York City alone and an estimated $50 billion in damage. On the anniversary of that catastrophe, researchers for Climate Central have More »

NICHI Marches With New Yorkers On Super Storm Sandy Fifth Anniversary

On Saturday, October 28, NICHI gathered with thousands of New Yorkers in Brooklyn for the #Sandy5 march to remember those we lost in Super Storm Sandy five years ago, and to stand with the victims of the devastating storms that hit Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida and the Caribbean this hurricane season. The march, led by young people More »

Storm Surge Barrier Recognized As Regional Solution

Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and Metropolitan Transportation Authority sponsor Storm Surge Working Group Coastal Resiliency Boat Tour   Boat Tour Media Coverage: City isn’t prepared for next Sandy, leaders pushing storm surge barrier say (AM New York, October 11) Making a Pitch, Again, for Barriers to Block Storm Surges (New York More »

On Superstorm Sandy Anniversary, New York is Ranked Most Vulnerable U.S. City [Newsweek]

By Nina Burleigh for Newsweek on October 29, 2017

Superstorm Sandy slammed the coasts of New Jersey and New York five years ago Sunday, leading to 157 deaths, 51 square miles of flooding in New York City alone and an estimated $50 billion in damage. On the anniversary of that catastrophe, researchers for Climate Central have ranked New York as the U.S. city most vulnerable to future storm surges and sea level rises, with 426,000 people living on land that is imperiled through 2050.

Not only is the world’s financial and arts center at least as vulnerable to future mega-storms as it was back then, but regional and federal policymakers don’t yet even have a comprehensive protection plan on the drawing board, let alone funding for that necessity.

On the contrary, local leaders could be seen as simply rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic, with piecemeal local plans to plant more trees and build berms, neither of which would protect the area from storm surge inundations of 20 feet or more that could be expected in conjunction with extreme weather events over the next two or three decades, according to the privately funded National Institute for Coastal and Harbor Infrastructure (NICHI).

NICHI Marches With New Yorkers On Super Storm Sandy Fifth Anniversary

On Saturday, October 28, NICHI gathered with thousands of New Yorkers in Brooklyn for the #Sandy5 march to remember those we lost in Super Storm Sandy five years ago, and to stand with the victims of the devastating storms that hit Puerto Rico, Texas, Florida and the Caribbean this hurricane season.

The march, led by young people of color from the communities that were hardest hit by Sandy, proceeded from Cadman Plaza over the Brooklyn Bridge to the Alfred E. Smith Houses in Lower Manhattan.

The National Institute for Coastal and Harbor Infrastructure and the NY NJ Storm Surge Working Group were among 150 participating local organizations, including the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance, the People’s Climate Movement, the Association for Neighborhood and Housing Development and the New York Immigration Coalition.

On Superstorm Sandy Anniversary, New York is Ranked Most Vulnerable U.S. City
(Newsweek, October 29)

With more superstorms predicted, there’s a dream project to keep New York above water
(Quartz, October 29)

Storm Surge Barrier Recognized As Regional Solution

Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and Metropolitan Transportation Authority sponsor Storm Surge Working Group Coastal Resiliency Boat Tour

 

Boat Tour Media Coverage:

City isn’t prepared for next Sandy, leaders pushing storm surge barrier say
(AM New York, October 11)

Making a Pitch, Again, for Barriers to Block Storm Surges
(New York Times, October 10)

Nearly 5 Years After Hurricane Sandy, Experts Say Tri-State Is Vulnerable To Another Storm
(CBS New York, October 10)

Storm Surge; Sandy Five Years Later
(Downtown Magazine, October 11)

Boat Tour Examines Resiliency of Shoreline Post-Sandy
(NJTV News for PBS, October 10)

Coastal Resiliency and Storm Surge Barrier Boat Tour: October 10

Commemorating the Fifth Anniversary of Super Storm Sandy

Presented by:
The NY NJ Metropolitan Storm Surge Working Group
The National Institute for Coastal and Harbor Infrastructure

Departing Chelsea Piers aboard the Classic Harbor Lines Yacht “Manhattan II”
Pier 62, West 22nd & the Hudson River

Tuesday, October 10, 2017  10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Join us as Scientists, Engineers, Urban Planners and other experts narrate a NYC waterfront view of the impacts of Sandy and how the NY NJ Metropolitan Regional Storm Surge Barrier would provide a “layered defense” protecting the city and 820 miles of NYC Metro coastline for the next 100 years or more.

Sponsor: $10,000
Co-Sponsor: $2,500
Ticket: $500

Tickets can be purchased by credit card donations HERE.

Please contact Bill Golden (wgolden@NICHIusa.org) to become a Boat Tour Sponsor.

Conference Brief: Protecting New York and New Jersey from Future Disastrous Storm Surges

 Protecting New York and New Jersey from Future Disastrous Storm Surges

Conference Brief 2017-05-18
Metropolitan NY-NJ Storm Surge Working Group
National Institute for Coastal & Harbor Infrastructure [1]

Frontispiece: flooding map resulting from Super Storm Sandy, 29 October 2012 [2]  (courtesy WNYC)

I. Background

 The World Economic Forum has declared that the largest threat to human civilization and the cause of most anxiety is the failure worldwide to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change[3]. The fourth anniversary last October of Superstorm Sandy and the associated catastrophic damage, destruction and human misery that resulted is a reminder that the greater New York Metropolitan area (specified here to include northern New Jersey, western Long Island and western Connecticut) continues to be largely exposed to future megastorms.

In fact, the threat grows greater with every passing year due to the expected increase in frequency and severity of extreme storm events, exacerbated by rising sea levels along the eastern seaboard. More than a million residents live at risk from storm surges in communities that are located in the floodplains of the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island, the south shore of western Long Island and many low-lying communities in New Jersey. Some communities, such as those surrounding Jamaica Bay, have already begun to experience flooding during lunar spring tides, even in settled weather.

Summary of Proceedings of the NY-NJ-LI Storm Surge Barrier Conference

Marriott Downtown Hotel, New York May 18, 2017

On May 18, 2017, the National Institute for Coastal and Harbor Infrastructure (NICHI) and the Metro New York-New Jersey Storm Surge Working Group (SSWG) convened a day-long conference, “Keeping the Water Out and the Lights On” at the Marriott Downtown Hotel in Lower Manhattan.

The conference co-sponsors included the Port Authority of NY & NJ, Regional Plan Association, New Jersey Future, The Waterfront Alliance, Cameron Engineering and Associates, Chelsea Piers, Waterside Plaza, Manhattan Borough President, The Alliance for Downtown New York, the Downtown-Lower Manhattan Association, Stony Brook University, Columbia University, and Society for American Military Engineers, Howard Hughes Corp., Standard and Poors, Goldman Sachs and others.

The conference focused on the urgent need to investigate the role that a regional system of movable surge barriers could play in creating layered defense to protect the metropolitan area from storm surges and sea level rise. This system would be designed to work in tandem with planned local barriers and other strategies.

Presentations from “Keeping the Water Out and the Lights On”

The following presentations were given during the NICHI conference, “Keeping the Water Out and the Lights On: The Option for a New York-New Jersey Regional Storm Surge Barrier.” The conference was held in New York City on May 18, 2017.

The Impact of rising sea levels and storm surge in the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Area: Sandy and Post Sandy
Professor Malcolm Bowman, Stony Brook SUNY SoMAS

The History and Evolution of a NY and NJ Metro Regional Surge Barrier System Option
Robert Yaro, Professor of Practice of City and Regional Planning, University of Pennsylvania, President Emeritus Regional Plan Association

Is New York City worth saving?

Storm Surge Barrier Conference: May 18, 2017

A conference on the urgent need for a New York harbor storm surge barrier took place Thursday, May 18, 2017, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm in New York. Presented by The National Institute for Coastal and Harbor Infrastructure and NY-NJ Metropolitan Storm Surge Working Group, co-sponsors included the Port Authority of NY & NJ; The Regional Plan Association (RPA); NJ Future; The Waterfront Alliance: Cameron Engineering & Associates; Chelsea Piers, Waterside Plaza, Borough President Gale Brewer; The Alliance for Downtown New York; The Downtown-Lower Manhattan Association; Columbia Law School Sabin Center; Stony Brook SUNY; and the Society of American Military Engineers.

Military mission and sea level rise

A September, 2016 report concludes that sea level rise at coastal military installations will present serious risks to military readiness, operations and strategy.  The report, Military Expert Panel Report: Sea Level Rise and the U.S. Military’s Mission, is available from the Center for Climate and Security.

“For the United States to remain strong and ready, we must ensure that our military and federal first responder capabilities can withstand and adapt to sea level rise,” said Vice Admiral Rob Parker, U.S. Coast Guard (ret). “There isn’t a region in the world where rising seas don’t affect our military readiness and operations, and complicate our ability to do our job.  For our Coast Guard this is particularly true as they are embedded in the communities they serve and doubly impacted at home and at work.”